Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Monday, November 17, 2008

Dealing with vision loss is challenging. For people with glaucoma, macular degeneration, or another vision problem, low-vision aids can help optimize remaining vision and improve the ability to perform daily activities.

Some examples of low-vision aids are telescopes, closed-circuit televisions (a small television camera is mounted on a movable tray; documents or other objects are moved under the camera and viewed on a small monitor), magnifying glasses, clocks and phones with large numbers, and large-print reading materials. Telescopes and closed-circuit televisions require an evaluation and prescription from an eye care professional as well as training in how to use them.

Many low-vision aids are available through low-vision clinics and low-vision rehabilitation services. Researchers are also testing implantation of a miniature telescope into damaged eyes.

Mild vision impairment has little effect on day-to-day activities, but moderate to severe vision impairment can make it difficult for people to perform common household tasks. Ophthalmologists and low-vision counselors recommend these simple, practical strategies to help patients with low vision maintain their independence.

Always leave doors completely open or completely closed. This reduces the risk of accidentally walking into the door edge if you have low vision.

Tack down loose rugs and use non-slip mats beneath them. Or you can hold down rugs with furniture to prevent slipping and tripping.

Tape a colorful piece of paper to all clear glass doors. If you have low vision, this will help you determine whether the door is open or closed and prevent collisions.

Avoid using glass-topped coffee or end tables. The edges are extremely difficult to see, making bumping injuries more likely if you have low vision.

Mark the important settings on the dials of the stove, washer, dryer, and other appliances using brightly colored tape.

Mark the outer edge of all indoor and outdoor stairs. Use a strip of paint or non-skid material in a color that contrasts with the rest of the step. The strip should extend about two inches from the edge -- both horizontally and vertically -- and should go across the full width of the step. This reduces the chances of tripping or falling on the stairs if you have low vision.

Have someone help you arrange clothing if you have color-vision problems. Separate items according to color and then use labeled dividers to identify them.


Post a Comment

Blog Roll