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Thursday, October 16, 2008

Even when you follow all the rules for cold and flu prevention, there's still a chance you or a family member could get sick. So how do you help relieve the symptoms and start feeling good again?

Feel Better Fast

Drink more fluids, especially water. Try to consume 6 to 8 glasses a day to prevent dehydration and help flush out illness-causing bacteria from your system. Also, drink some orange juice for vitamin C and herbal tea to calm hurting throats.
Take a hot bath or shower. The steam is both comforting and a great decongestant for stuffy noses.
Eat potent foods like garlic, ginger, and spicy dishes to clear up sinuses.
Honey is excellent for sore throats. Take it with tea, mix with hot water and lemon, or eat a few spoonfuls alone.
Take supplements as needed to make sure you are getting the recommended dietary allowances for vitamin A, the vitamin B complex, and vitamin C, as well as the minerals zinc and copper.
Grapefruit is a great food for fighting a cold. It's high in vitamin C and also helps detoxify the liver, which helps to promote a healthy immune system.

First it's the sniffles, and then coughing and sneezing. Before you know it, your whole family is suffering. But this cold and flu season, you can help protect your family from getting sick. Learn the facts, like what causes colds and the flu, and the best ways to prevent the spread of germs in your household, and you can help keep your family happy and healthy all season.

Prevention is Key

What Causes Colds and the Flu?
A major cause of the common cold is rhinovirus, which is primarily transmitted by touching contaminated surfaces or other people's hands and then touching your eyes and nose. According to the Visiting Nurse Associations of America (VNAA), more than 100 types of rhinoviruses cause problems year-round, but especially in the early fall months when school is back in session and they can spread much more easily.

Influenza, also called the flu, is a contagious acute viral disease of the respiratory tract. The flu typically spreads through airborne droplets produced by cough and sneezing, but can also be transmitted through direct contact with germs, just like colds.

What Can You Do About It
Disinfect Where Germs Live

New research shows your home may be germier than you think. The study and survey come from the Hygiene Council (funded by Reckitt Benckiser, the makers of LYSOL® Brand products). Researchers visited 35 U.S. homes, swabbing for bacteria in 32 locations in each home. Out of the 32 places in the home, the top spots for bacteria are the toilet bowl, kitchen drain, kitchen sponge or counter-wiping cloth, bathtub, and kitchen sink. Read more. (Source: WebMD)
LYSOL Disinfectant Spray, LYSOL Disinfecting Wipes, LYSOL Disinfectant Spray To GoGerms can survive for up to three hours on household surfaces like kitchen counter tops, sinks, and phone receivers. Use LYSOL Disinfectant Spray to kill germs and bacteria and get rid of nasty viruses that can cause the spread of colds and the flu.
Even when you don't have a lot of time to clean up, you can easily disinfect surfaces with LYSOL Disinfecting Wipes—just a few quick swipes will kill bacteria in your home.
You can still ward off illness-causing germs when you're on the go with the help of LYSOL Disinfectant Spray To Go, a compact 1-ounce travel size disinfectant spray. It's perfect for use in public restaurants and bathrooms, hotels, and gyms.

Wash Your Hands Often

Germs spread most easily through hand-to-hand contact, so stress the importance of regular hand washing to your family. Wash hands before every meal, after using the bathroom, and after touching doorknobs or railings in public places. Always wash hands with warm water and soap for at least 20 seconds to eliminate the most germs.
When water isn't readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), hand sanitizers can help remove germs and reduce the risk of colds and respiratory illnesses.

Practice Safe Habits

Try to steer clear of other people who have colds or the flu—close contact with them is the easiest way to become ill. Talk to the parents of your kids' good friends to find out if they're already sick. If they are, have your kids skip their regular play dates and scheduled outings for a week or two.
Avoid putting your hands near your eyes, nose, and mouth to prevent infections that lead to colds and the flu.
Get plenty of rest. Fatigue can reduce immune functioning, making you much more susceptible to sickness.
For some people, getting a flu shot can be an essential precaution. Young children, adults over 60, pregnant women, and those with chronic medical conditions are encouraged to get the flu vaccine. Ask your doctor or find out more on the CDC Web site at CDC


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